The Manifest

mousymo:

Ghost Drifting is said to be an unanticipated consequence of the Neural Handshake. Pilots are said to find that their link remains somewhat active, though muted, after they’ve disconnected from the hardware. Pilots who Drift with one another long enough begin to adopt certain personality traits of their partner, but their own core personality and consciousness remain intact.

(inspired by x)

sidneybristows:

know you are the type of woman 
who is searching for a place to call yours.
let the statues crumble.
you have always been the place.
you are a woman who can build it yourself.
YOU WERE BORN TO BUILD. (insp)

geniusbee:

"Numbers are as close as we get to the handwriting of god." 

Meta comic - I wanted to explore my headcanon for Hermann’s unique sense of faith. 

barnacle-butt:

Pacific Rim is not a dumb movie at all. It is a visually intelligent movie.

One of the arguments I’ve seen repeatedly from multiple feminist critics can be summed up thus: Mako Mori is not a strong, well developed female character, because she only has a few lines. In a way, I feel the whole basic problem with our current discourse can be boiled down to just that one phrase. The character’s relative depth is entirely contingent on how many lines of dialogue she gets. That, right there, is the devaluation of nonverbal, visual communication in favor of a… well, I’m not even sure what to call this. It’s certainly no critical method that I’ve ever seen. Counting the number of lines a character gets is… well, kind of a bizarre standard, because it utterly divorces the actual content of those lines from their quantity. The thing about Mako Mori, though, is that while her lines may be few, they pack a punch. In fact, they have strength in part due to how quiet she typically is—when she does speak, she is direct and forceful, and you know she’s not speaking trivially. But that’s not exactly what I’m here to talk about. I want to talk about the visual cues surrounding this character. Mako’s character development is actually almost entirely visual in nature—no one talks through her memories or explains her motivations aloud. What’s more, her personality and character arc is defined strongly by color symbolism. So, while she doesn’t have a huge number of lines, that doesn’t make her shallow. Let’s talk about that color symbolism my girlfriend picked up on. Mako’s colors in the film are blue and dark grey. The blue is, actually, the brightest spot of color that we see on her initially, and we are drawn to the blue highlight in her hair because it contrasts in saturation with the rest of her character design.

barnacle-butt:

Pacific Rim is not a dumb movie at all. It is a visually intelligent movie.

One of the arguments I’ve seen repeatedly from multiple feminist critics can be summed up thus:

Mako Mori is not a strong, well developed female character, because she only has a few lines.

In a way, I feel the whole basic problem with our current discourse can be boiled down to just that one phrase. The character’s relative depth is entirely contingent on how many lines of dialogue she gets. That, right there, is the devaluation of nonverbal, visual communication in favor of a… well, I’m not even sure what to call this. It’s certainly no critical method that I’ve ever seen. Counting the number of lines a character gets is… well, kind of a bizarre standard, because it utterly divorces the actual content of those lines from their quantity.

The thing about Mako Mori, though, is that while her lines may be few, they pack a punch. In fact, they have strength in part due to how quiet she typically is—when she does speak, she is direct and forceful, and you know she’s not speaking trivially.

But that’s not exactly what I’m here to talk about. I want to talk about the visual cues surrounding this character. Mako’s character development is actually almost entirely visual in nature—no one talks through her memories or explains her motivations aloud. What’s more, her personality and character arc is defined strongly by color symbolism. So, while she doesn’t have a huge number of lines, that doesn’t make her shallow.

Let’s talk about that color symbolism my girlfriend picked up on. Mako’s colors in the film are blue and dark grey. The blue is, actually, the brightest spot of color that we see on her initially, and we are drawn to the blue highlight in her hair because it contrasts in saturation with the rest of her character design.

charliehnnm:

Pacific Rim | reality vs drift

fanbingblink:

We should see all the things that make people and the world different and not pretend that we are colorblind or that one story is enough to represent a whole group of people.

Sara Farizan

beyondthewavves:

"Please Doctor, it’s the only medicine we’ve got.”

OH MY FUCKING GOD THIS IS BALTO.. 978 OTHER PEOPLE HAVE REBLOGGED THIS THAT MEANS THERE ARE MORE PEOPLE WHO LOVE THIS FUCKING MOVIE. EVERYTIME I ASK PEOPLE IF THEY REMEMBER IT THEY THINK I’M TALKING ABOUT BOLT AND IT KILLS ME INSIDE

i have hope